Russia plans to deliver missiles to Turkey in July- Reports

Last Updated: Jun 12 2019 17:12
Reading time: 1 min, 31 secs

ISTANBUL- On Tuesday, Russia said that it plans to deliver its S-400 missile defence systems to Turkey in July, setting the clock ticking on a U.S. threat to hit Ankara with sanctions if it goes ahead with a deal that has strained ties between the NATO allies.  

Turkey and the United States have sparred publicly for months over Ankara's order for the S-400s, which are not compatible with the transatlantic alliance's systems.

Washington has threatened to remove Turkey from its F-35 fighter jet programme unless it drops the deal, and has set its own deadline of July 31. If Ankara accepts delivery of the S-400s, that would trigger U.S. sanctions that could prolong Turkey's economic recession and prompt a re-evaluation of its 67-year membership of NATO.

Turkey said that a U.S. House of Representatives' resolution on Monday condemning the S-400 purchase and urging sanctions was unacceptably threatening.  

Later on Tuesday in Moscow, Kremlin aide Yury Ushakov told reporters: "The agreements reached between Russia and Turkey are being fulfilled on time in the given context. There are no bilateral problems." Asked if the surface-to-air missiles will be delivered in July, he said: "Yes, that's what we plan somehow."

The U.S. resolution, introduced in May and entitled "Expressing concern for the United States-Turkey alliance", was agreed in the House on Monday. It urges Turkey to cancel the S-400 purchase and calls for sanctions if Ankara accepts their delivery. That, the resolution said, would undermine the U.S.-led transatlantic defence alliance. 

In response, Turkey`s Foreign Ministry said on Tuesday that its foreign policy and judicial system were being maligned by "unfair" and "unfounded" allegations in the resolution.

"It is unacceptable to take decisions which do not serve to increase mutual trust, to continue to keep the language of threats and sanctions on the agenda and to set various artificial deadlines," it added in a statement.